Prawns, Music and Dinghies, Oh My

Good day furiends. My humans finally caught me some prawns. Meowee, they are just delish when they are so fresh and raw. Cooked ones are purrty good too. That’s how the humans eat them. I’m starting to learn that I can purrform my tricks without being asked and it’s working well to get treats.

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Here in BC we have prawns called Spot Prawns because they have white spots on their shell. They are the largest of 7 commercial species of shrimp found in Canada’s west coast waters. According to SeaChoice (a watch dog organization concerned with the health of our fisheries and oceans), wild, trap-caught, B.C. spot prawns are a “Best Choice” option based on four sustainability criteria used for assessment:

1. Impacts on the species under assessment
2. Impacts on other species
3. Effectiveness of management
4. Habitat and ecosystem impacts

My humans use 4 baited  traps on long lines attached to buoys that are lowered about 400 feet into the water. Meowee, that’s a long ways down. Thank goodness they have an electric puller to bring them back up to the surface otherwise it would be really hard on their arms and they might not want to try prawn catching as often. That would be bad.

IMG_9819[1]This evening was the dinghy concert. An American country singer named Robin Landry, and her band the Chicksie Dixs, flew into Prideaux Haven and purrformed for a couple hours on the swim deck at the stern of a huge 80 foot boat called Pres du Soleil. A sea of dinghies all raft together behind the boat with all the humans eating, drinking and generally being silly. It’s getting bigger every year. Again I stayed behind and boat sat while all the humans left to go to it. It was the 5th annual concert, and my humans have attended 3 of them now. Two years ago it was the rain concert, last year the sun concert, and this year the smoke concert. What will next year’s be weather-wise I wonder.

If you like seafood and music, what kind do you like? Paw paw for now.

=^,,^=

 

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A Tasteful Seafood Elegy?

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Dearly departed, we have gathered you here on this plate,
to witness the fulfillment of this your fate;

Caught in baited traps on the ocean’s rocky bottom,
up from the depths of your cold briny darksome;

Whether you be grilled, sauteed, or even just steamed,
As a main dish you are highly esteemed.

So tasty, so savoury, you’re one of life’s greatest Treats,
we give you our thanks as we take our seats;

Bless’ed is your fusion with lemon, garlic and butter,
Seasoned with a sprinkle of salt ‘n pepper;

A bite of fire and spice the flavour of curry does bring,
Through summer to autumn to winter and spring;

With a dower of sweet ‘n sour on a bed of rice I may toss
Or simply dip in a tangy cocktail sauce

The ever so fresh, so decadent and succulent spot prawn,
I opened my mouth and then you were gone.

=^,,^=


Poetry 101 Day 8: Make today’s poem about one flavor and why it matters to you. (Feel like addressing multiple flavors? Go for it!). Form: Elegy: A moment, a place, a person, a feeling — your elegy can be about anything, as long as it evokes a thing that’s irretrievably gone. There’s a lot you can do with enumeratio — today’s suggested literary device — in your poems. As its name might suggest, it basically means constructing a list, a successive enumeration (duh!) of multiple elements in the same series. Enumeratio often entails the repetition of conjunctions like “and” and “or” — you can use them in clever ways, for example, to create internal rhymes or assonance.

Treated in Tenedo’s Bay

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Meow my furiends. It’s been hot hot hot. We spent the last 3 days rafted up in beautiful Desolation Sound Marine Provincial Park with it’s more than 60 km of shoreline, several islands, numerous small bays and snug coves. The warm waters of the park are ideal for swimming and scuba diving and the forested upland offers a shady refuge of trails, small lakes, and designated campsites. This park can be split up into three major destination anchorages: Prideaux Haven, Tenedo’s Bay and Grace Harbour. Continue reading