Out on a Ledge

Photography 101 Day 18 Today is all about straight edges, and tweaking your image to ensure your lines are perfectly positioned. Today, show us an edge — a straight line, a narrow ridge, a precipice.


Minstrel has many ledges and edges that I love to explore. My territory is contained within them. From the bow to the stern, the brow to the dash, I find where the best advantage points are to survey my surroundings, or to take a nap.  I love looking down the sides of Minstrel. The lines of her narrow side walkways reach back and forth to the edges of the world, and beyond.

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Strait Up Black & White Seascapes

Photography 101 Day 15 It’s a big world out there! Show us what you see in a landscape. We’ve spent time practicing our establishing shots, capturing street scenes, and observing the natural world. Today, let’s walk in the footsteps of masters like Ansel Adams and focus on landscape photography.


Desolation Sound, BC

Bedwell Bay, Indian Arm, BC

Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black-and-white landscape photographs of the American West, especially Yosemite National Park, have been widely reproduced on calendars, posters, and books.

Wikipedia

Some pawsome seascape views of the Pacific West Coast. The coastal mountains and majestic fjords of the Pacific West Coast can reach up to 7,000 feet from sea level, creating some very layered and stunning backgrounds. While I consider these serene shots to be in direct contrast to the hard and dramatic scenes typically captured by Ansel Adams, hopefully they still follow the “straight photography” style that he pursued.

SPOILER ALERT!…Today furiends, the second photo was taken my human dad…meowee! He likes taking pictures too, and his Bedwell Bay, Indian Arm, BC photo (the colour version) will be featured in our PMPSS 2015 Seascapes calendar that my human mom published with the help of the membership who supplied their photos.

Happy Caturday!

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Building Memories In Black & White

Photography 101, Day 12 Study architectural forms, and also train your eye to look for shots that will translate well in black and white. As we explored yesterday, color is a powerful element in photography. But let’s not forget black and white, or monochrome, which can be very dramatic! Black, white, gray, and shades in between interact in the frame in dynamic ways.


Boating around in False Creek one day (before I was born), mom took some photos of these two iconic buildings in downtown Vancouver, BC…Science World and BC Place Stadium. These places hold a few special memories for her. About 15 years ago, mom and her human sons, along with several hundred others human boys and adult leaders, slept in Science World overnight once as part of a Scouts Canada event. It got a little crazy she said, but was a lot of fun. A night she’ll never forget. Unfortunately none of the photos she took that night turned out.

BC Place stadium is home to the BC Lions football team, and in 2011 Vancouver hosted the 99th Grey Cup game. The humans cruised downtown in Minstrel and partied all weekend long during the festivities. It also got a little crazy, but was a lot of fun, and the Lions ended up winning the championship! With mom’s help, dad managed to get all the pawtographs of the Felion Cheerleader Dance Team featured in their calendar, which he gave to his nephew for Christmas. Meowee, they shore are purrdy fur humans! Vancouver is once again hosting the Grey Cup at the end of this month. Unfortunately the Lions aren’t in it.

I helped mom choose the black and white settings for today’s theme. We didn’t realize there were so many combinations of black, white, gray and monochrome! You can click on the photos for a larger view. We hope you like the results.

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The Nature of Leading Lines

Photography 101, Day 8 Capture a moment, big or small, and pay attention to the lines and curves produced by nature. Envision the bend of a stream, or the curve of a petal: how can you use these lines in your composition? If you see strong vertical, horizontal, or diagonal lines, can you play with the orientation to create a more dynamic composition? Can you apply — or break — the Rule of Thirds?


If I was a tabby,  a bengal, or a tiger, I would have a lot of lines and curvy patterns on me for mom to photograph. But I’m not. Instead, she went through her photos  from all the pawsome places we went our cruises this summer to find examples of leading lines in nature and these were some of the obvious ones, but you could say they were unintentional. Going forward she will try to look for and use them more. One interesting tip she learned from this exercise was that there are leading lines and paths. The difference between a leading line and a path is that a leading line takes you to a point of interest in the frame, and a path tends to lead you to a vanishing point.

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Tall Drink of Water

Photography 101, Day 3: For day three, we want to see your interpretation of water — how might your image reveal more about you? Ever wonder whether a photograph will work better horizontally or vertically? It’s a great question to ask when looking through your viewfinder! After you snap your picture, rotate your camera and take a second shot from the other orientation — horizontally if you first took the picture vertically, and vice versa. If you’re aiming for an establishing shot, what orientation works better? How does a vertical shot affect your scene? Which version do you prefer?


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This is what water reveals about me. You may notice the water reverses my image. Almost all our photos taken with an iPhone are vertical (above), and almost all taken with the DSL are horizontal (below). Mom has been experimenting with refraction and water, and found a really unique photo on the web that she’s trying to re-create. We haven’t succeeded yet, but still working on it and these are what we’ve managed so far. We like whichever orientation fits with what we are trying to capture. A waterfall would probably fit  better vertically, where as a sunset would most likely be more flattering horizontally.

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Being the editor of our boating group’s newsletter, my human runs a photo contest and puts together a couple of theme calendars consisting of the winning photos taken by her fellow PMPSS (Port Moody Power & Sail Squadron) members. One of the themes is called Waterscapes, and the other is Pets & Wildlife. Those photos are from the 2013 calendar. The 2014 calendar photos will be uploaded to Flickr in December, and the 2015 calendars just went to the printer. One criteria that she insists on is that all the photos have to be horizontal because “landscape” (horizontal) is the paper orientation.

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