Motion Monday – On Seagull Watch

First it was geese, then ducks and a swan, and now I have to safeguard all our freshly caught seafood from these intelligent but pesky birds. They float idly around the boat for hours just waiting for an oppurrtunity to grab and go. Not on my watch they don’t.

One interesting fact my human told me was that “Seagulls can drink both fresh and salt water. Most animals are unable to do this, but seagulls have a special pair of glands right above their eyes which is specifically designed to flush the salt from their systems through openings in the bill.”

I had a checkup by a cat doctor 2 weeks ago and my blood work didn’t indicate a lack or abundance of salt in my system, so I guess I’m normal. However, I have been having a bit of a salt craving and discovered that anything around the anchor chain to be a tasty source. Upon further research by my ever curious human mom, it is actually safe for us kitties to routinely drink salt water since we can tolerate a higher salt intake than humans. While humans have to watch their salt intake, it appears that we don’t have to do the same. Our kidneys are able to excrete sodium at a much greater efficiency than humans.

Today we are in Campbell River visiting the human’s friends. Their house is actually riverfront with a dock and we are tied up to it.  After we pulled up over 200 prawns and left Cassel Falls in Teakearne Arm (the humans were right again about Teakearne Arm) we headed west to Cortes Bay which is a bit south of Squirrel Cove. There human’s friends showed up in their fishing boat to take them fishing. It was a little bouncy out in the wide open water so I volunteered to stay and take care of Minstrel until they came back. Yesterday the humans fished their way across the strait while waiting for the tide to be high enough to get up the river. Again the humans have gone fishing and the wind is still really gusty so this time both me and my human mom volunteered to stay on Minstrel.

Next post I will have some fishy tails to tells you. Paw paw for now! =^,,^=

I’m So Gull-ible

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The weather, forecasted to be gray and rainy, unexpectedly turned out to be sunny and dry. After our Remembrance Day Service at Belcarra Regional Park yesterday, we returned to our Marina for a bit of an afternoon dock party. The humans set out their deck chairs, furnished a few deck tables with appetizers, and enjoyed the glorious afternoon together.

I was almost allowed to roam at will, but the humans were a little further away from our boat Minstrel than I was comfortable with and instead I started trespassing on a few boats in between. That ended with me getting closed up inside Minstrel for the rest of the day, which was okay because it was my nap time anyways.

But what really caught my attention just before then was the dock leading the other way, along the marina’s breakwater, that was standing room only for a flock of seagulls. My oh my, if I could only join that party! I did try. I lowered my body as low as it would go and almost floated across the dock as I skulked towards them. Unfortunately they have really keen eyesight, and as if on cue a large section of them closest to me just flew up in the air, only to land a little further down the dock. They weren’t ever going to let me get too close. Mom didn’t like the look of the big mess of fresh runny poop they left behind and shushed meow back to boat before meow, or her, could step in any of it. But what a rush though.

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Here on the west coast of North America we have the western gull (Larus occidentalis). Did you know that an older name for gulls is mew? In German it’s Möwe, Danish måge, Dutch meeuw, and French mouette. These gulls typically live for 15-25 years. One of a gulls favourite food are mussels which are readily available to them at this time of year along the docks at the waterline. They carry the shelled morsels up into the air and drop them onto hard surfaces, a method used to crack them open. We are constantly finding empty black shells, and sometimes crab shells, all over Minstrel’s decks. Clever, but messy birds.

My human said she had read a rather humorous news article about a lady in Paignton, Devon (a small town in England) who reported having about 50 golf balls dropped on her house one summer by seagulls. They probably saw the balls as potential food, but then gulls see most things as potential food. Clever yes, but not so smart.

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=^,,^=


Writing 101 Day 10: So far, we’ve found inspiration from our own experiences, images, words, and more. Today, let’s quietly observe the world around us and write about what we see. Find a spot where you can sit and observe for at least 20 minutes: a bench at a park, shopping mall, or museum; from inside your car in a parking lot; or even a place close to home, like your front porch. Ideally, it’s a location where you can watch action and interaction in a setting (between people, wildlife, weather, etc.) Don’t be afraid to take risks! Your response can be purely nonfiction and be an exact report of what you see, or a piece of creative nonfiction that uses storytelling elements (like point of view, pacing, and dialogue) to shape a more dramatic narrative.