Fishy Friday Kisses in Campbell River

Meowee furiends, look what my human caught! Meow very own fish! A Spring or Chinook salmon. Sometimes it takes a long time to catch one. Hours and hours even. So understandably I was resting below deck when the big event happened so I missed being there to get my photo with it before it was packed away on ice to keep it fresh. However, after we got to the human’s friends dock, I got to meet it.

Have you ever kissed a fish before? Apparently it’s a thing and I just did it too. It’s an old tradition although sparse on the details. The why’s and wherefurs of the purractise diffurs from one to another but here are a few reasons:

            • To bring good luck
            • To attract more fish
            • A thank you for getting caught
            • Apologize for catching
            • Out of respect
            • Speed up healing from hook (only for catch and release fish)
            • To become a true Newfoundlander
            • Selfie opportunity
            • A dare

Is it safe to kiss a fish? Due to fish being known to host to a variety of microscopic parasites, you could run the risk of getting a viral infection when kissing it. That can be further amplified if the water it was caught in was contaminated with any toxic waste and bacteria, either resulting in an upset tummy and severe diarrhea for several days.

I supurrvised the human as he cut up the fish, and the one he caught the day before, into smaller dinner sized pieces, but when he got out the machine to shrink wrap them to put in the freezer, I headed out to my usual purrch to relax and keep a watch out for any flying thieves. Now we will have fish all year round.

 

Next we are heading for warmer water and less windy areas back in one of our faourite places, Prideaux Haven, for a couple days. Paw paw for now =^,,^=

Friday Furiends – Meet Oliver

Each time we go cruising I get to meet some new furiends. Mostly dogs but on the odd occasion I hear about other cats lurking below the decks of their boat who rarely make it out on deck so we can get introduced. Today I’d like to introduce Oliver.

Oliver is a 10 month old Yorkshire Terrier. He is very vocal and protective of his boat so even when you look at him he starts yapping away incessantly. His redeeming quality is that he is so darn cute. Oliver’s humans have setup a pee pad on their back deck for him. To me that makes more sense than trying to find somewhere on shore several times a day, that isn’t covered in razor sharp oyster shells, and/or in the pouring rain. Instead the grass-like mat is simply rinsed off in the ocean and ready to use again. Easy peesy.

Oliver likes to chew things. He has a chicken chew toy named Henrietta but he’d rather chew on things that he shouldn’t like the ropes of the fenders or the lines to tie the boat to a dock, or the strap on the fire extinguisher or any of loose piece wood he can find inside the boat. Once he has managed to get a forbidden prize of some sort, off he runs around the deck of his 50 foot Grand Banks boat, with his human mom chasing after him. He is such a little dickens. My human mom chases me around the deck sometimes too but just for fun and a bit of exercise.

We are leaving Squirrel Cove and heading East over to Teakerne Arm this morning. My humans say that’s the best place for prawns… so hurry up and let’s get going!

Paw paw for now =^,,^=

 

 

Going to Gorge Harbour

IMG_3166The raft-up separated slightly this morning with 3 vessels heading to Princess Louisa Marine Provincial Park, and 5 heading west to Gorge Harbour; about a 3 hour cruise for Minstrel. The water was calm and a pleasure to boat through. The skies were showing patches of blue, and the temperature was maintaining it’s warmth. I’ve quite taken to sleeping now while we travel; it helps passes the time very comfortably.

Before I knew it Minstrel was tied up to the dock at Gorge Harbour Marina. The main dock sections were double wide and it felt like land. But before I knew it, I was tied up too. Mom read a sign further up the dock that advised guests that all dogs had to be on a leash while on the dock. So when human mom saw me wandering off the boat, she wasted no time in putting my harness and leash on me. Wait, I’m not a dog!

This place was rather uneventful for me. In the afternoon, the humans went swimming in the pool, then to the restaurant fur dinner with the other humans, so there was no opportunity fur catching a fish or some prawns today. I’ll just have to catch them in my dreams fur now.

=^,,^=IMG_3163

Bumpy Ride to Garden Bay

IMG_1111

Comfortable in my carrier on a bumpy Salish Sea.

July 31st we left on our 2 week “Northern Sea Cruise” with the Port Moody Power & Sail Squadron. Our first stop over was in Pender Harbour on the Sunshine Coast, one of our traditional stops on the way out, and back again on the way home.

It was a beautiful day but the Salish Sea was bumpy and the ride was rough. I don`t fare so well in those conditions and I tend to drool  and have other bodily reactions that are not befitting to mention of a cool seafaring cat such as myself….and it`s a 6 hour cruise. My human mom scooped me up in a blanket and took me outside to the upper helm deck. Even though the motion is more noticeable there, at least there is fresh air. I sat quietly with her for a couple of hours and then they brought up my carrier for me to lie in. Once we passed through Welcome Pass, the waves had started to subside which helped immensely. I was slowly feeling better and getting my sea legs back.

IMG_2749

Entering Pender Harbour, BC

IMG_2749 (2)

Waiting for the rest of the fleet to arrive at Garden Bay Marina in Pender Harbour, BC

To state the obvious, I was quite relieved once we were tied up to the dock at Garden Bay Marina. A few chews on my oat grass and I was feeling back to normal. We are here for a couple of days before heading out to our next stop. If you`d like to see where we are or have been, check out My Geocat Map. Mom will also be looking for any nearby geocaches and taking my trackable travel fish tag along to visit them. =^,,^=

.

First Santa Ships Selfie

053
This weekend we had our first Santa’s Christmas Ships parade and all went very well. The weather couldn’t have been more purrfect for cruising at night. I was helping mom get the boat all decorated and everything was looking very festive for our guests until those pesky black crows showed up! Wait, who invited them?! I defended the inside of the boat as best I could, but the Christmas village on the dash suffered a little.

031

027

I got to spend the whole weekend on the boat and enjoyed our Santa Ship’s cruise very much. Friday night we had about 14 ships, and on Saturday night twelve ships cruised up Indian Arm into Bedwell Bay, one of our favourite weekend anchorages, and was met with a show of fireworks from the landlubbers who showed their appreciation for our presence which we appreciate immensely too.

=^,,^=

This is a blog hop!

Powered by Linky Tools

Click here to enter your link and view more selfies…

Out on a Ledge

Photography 101 Day 18 Today is all about straight edges, and tweaking your image to ensure your lines are perfectly positioned. Today, show us an edge — a straight line, a narrow ridge, a precipice.


Minstrel has many ledges and edges that I love to explore. My territory is contained within them. From the bow to the stern, the brow to the dash, I find where the best advantage points are to survey my surroundings, or to take a nap.  I love looking down the sides of Minstrel. The lines of her narrow side walkways reach back and forth to the edges of the world, and beyond.

=^,,^=

Strait Up Black & White Seascapes

Photography 101 Day 15 It’s a big world out there! Show us what you see in a landscape. We’ve spent time practicing our establishing shots, capturing street scenes, and observing the natural world. Today, let’s walk in the footsteps of masters like Ansel Adams and focus on landscape photography.


Desolation Sound, BC

Bedwell Bay, Indian Arm, BC

Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black-and-white landscape photographs of the American West, especially Yosemite National Park, have been widely reproduced on calendars, posters, and books.

Wikipedia

Some pawsome seascape views of the Pacific West Coast. The coastal mountains and majestic fjords of the Pacific West Coast can reach up to 7,000 feet from sea level, creating some very layered and stunning backgrounds. While I consider these serene shots to be in direct contrast to the hard and dramatic scenes typically captured by Ansel Adams, hopefully they still follow the “straight photography” style that he pursued.

SPOILER ALERT!…Today furiends, the second photo was taken my human dad…meowee! He likes taking pictures too, and his Bedwell Bay, Indian Arm, BC photo (the colour version) will be featured in our PMPSS 2015 Seascapes calendar that my human mom published with the help of the membership who supplied their photos.

Happy Caturday!

=^,,^=

Green Boating

Photography 101 Day 11, Colors can stir emotions within us, tell stories, and transform our images. Today, use one color to add life or drama to your shot.


003

Pop of Green Floor Sign, Vancouver Boat Show

 

For over fifty years, the Vancouver International Boat Show has been, and still is, one of the best ways to find the latest & most innovative boating products on the market. For a modest entrance fee, boaters have access to free seminars put on by boating experts including hands-on skills training, and free 30-minute power or sailboat rides to get a taste of the boating life. The Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons is there too teaching boaters about being safe on the water. 

What about keeping the water safe? In our boating play ground called the Strait of Georgia (or Salish Sea) on the Pacific West Coast, which provides us with some of the most pawsome cruising waters in the world, there are over 350,000 boats! Meowee, that’s a lot! And we need to make sure we minimize our impact on it especially in high use areas such as marinas, anchorages and marine parks. Boat shows are a great venue to learn more about sensitive areas, birds, fish and other critters that depend on our waters. The Strait of Georgia Alliance puts out a Guide to Green Boating. As a green boater, you pledge to:

  • Manage your sewage responsibly.
  • Take care when fueling.
  • Use bilge filters or bilge pads.
  • Maintain your boat.
  • Use environmentally friendly cleaning products & bottom paint.
  • Dispose of all wastes properly.
  • Keep learning.

The next Vancouver International Boat Show will be held January 21-25, 2015 at BC Place Stadium and Granville Island. Our squadron has added the boat show as a cruise destination to our cruise schedule.  The marina we dock at is nestled on the waterfront of the vibrant Yaletown neighborhood and is a daytime hub of activity in the southeastern part of downtown Vancouver. It’s surrounded by parks, patio restaurants, urban apartments and modern condos of residential towers with spectacular views. The Vancouver sea wall passes right along by the marina and is one of the docking places for both the Aquabus and False Creek Ferry routes to Granville Island. All the amenities of gracious urban living can be found nearby, from the gourmet markets, yoga establishments and public transit, to the busy nightlife and boutiques. Our members have a lot of fun there and I really look forward to going, and you can look forward to my report on anything to do with boats and furiends.

=^,,^=

All Is Naut Lost – Part I

Writing 101, Day 4 – Today, write about a loss. The twist: make this the first post in a three-post series. (Part II, Part III)


Meow my furiends. The topic of this assignment couldn’t be more purrfect. It’s so amazing how the catzmos works at times.  I was trying to figure out how to start telling this true story about something remarkable that happened to my mom but it’s a bit long so  breaking it up into parts solves that problem. Continue reading

My Happy Place

Writing 101, Day 2: We’re all drawn to certain places. If you had the power to get somewhere — anywhere — where would you go right now? For your twist, focus on building a setting description.


The metal springs squeaked in recoil as the female human squeezed the latches to open the barred door of my travel carrier. Out I leap onto the L-shaped built-in couch flanking the starboard side of the galley, the dense upholstery sporting a fine tweed checker of black and tan. It had been awhile since fresh air flowed freely in the cabin and the unmistakable smell of stale engine oil, hot rubber and plastic reminded me where I was. As my humans busied themselves opening doors and windows and organizing their stuff, I set about to take inventory. Continue reading