News Flash: Curiosity Didn’t Kill The Cat…Satisfied?

IMG_3192Ok, so being a cat, wouldn’t it be fair to say I’m naturally curious about things? Isn’t it in stereotypical fashion that I would venture off to investigate other blogs to see what’s happening elsewhere?  Shouldn’t I be able to hop from blog to blog without getting shooed back to the proverbial boat, so to speak? I mean who wouldn’t wonder why the door at the end of the hall was several inches off the floor? Just because someone else asked that question, is it wrong to comment that you were wondering the same thing?:

I was going to ask the same….mol =^,,^=

So why out of the blue would a visitor there feel the need to reply to my comment with:

Okay, Pawcific–I guess you’ve heard that curiosity killed the cat? Better leave the questions to the humans.

? Is it just me, or was I just shooed away? Wasn’t the only logical thing for meow to reply back with:

Yes, and you must have also heard that satisfaction brought it back =^,.^=

? But then, how should I have taken the reply that followed?:

Yes, but that part never made much sense to me. Could you explain how satisfaction could resuscitate the deceased? Sorry kitty, not that I don’t want you to have 9 lives. Just doesn’t seem logical!

Was this bird mocking me? She did realize she was asking a cat didn’t she? However, it wouldn’t have been fair to the blogger whose comment section would have been hijacked in trying to explain it there now would it? Instead, taking advantage of expanding on a comment here on my blog is the “cat’s meow” don’t you think?  This cautionary expression sounds more like the moral of some fable or folktale, but has any such origin for it been lost? Did it really start out from Shakespeare’s time as “Care (meaning sorrow or worry) killed the cat?” Does cat actually mean cat or is it some anthropomorphism that refers to the curious nature of humans?  Has anything ever killed a mood, or a desire in you? In the play “Much Ado About Nothing” might the satisfaction adjoiner be a translation from the latter half of “What, courage man! what though care killed a cat, thou hast mettle enough in thee to kill care.”? Metaphors are so tricky don’t you agree?

Why wouldn’t someone twist it around to the popular saying it is now to suit their needs? It is telling someone it’s best to mind their own business? Can being curious get you into trouble? Is it something that you say in order to warn someone not to ask too many questions about something? If not questioning the boundaries of the known, how will you humans ever know if there is limit to knowledge?  When reviving the unconscious or near dead, resuscitate is the appropriate term for that, correct? Therefore resurrect is more appropriately used in the case of the deceased, right? Isn’t the question then can I explain how satisfaction could resurrect the dead? Now, could it be a biblical parable? Wasn’t it when the human’s God was satisfied with his son’s redemptive death that he resurrected him? I’m no religious scholar but doesn’t that seem a logical connection?

I didn’t ask too many tough questions did I? It probably was annoying wasn’t it? We cats are like that sometimes aren’t we? But isn’t looking so adorable one of our most redeeming qualities? Was it worth the risk? Well, aren’t you glad to see that me and my nine lives weren’t killed in the process? Do you have any further thoughts or questions you’d like to add in the comments about this proverb? If it’s more than a few sentences long, maybe you’d care to expand on that in your own blog?

=^,-^=


Writing 101 Day 8: Do you ever peek at the comments you’ve left on other blogs? You might find ideas for future posts. Perhaps you left a response on a writer’s post but could have said even more, or wrote the beginnings of a larger discussion.