Fishy Friday Kisses in Campbell River

Meowee furiends, look what my human caught! Meow very own fish! A Spring or Chinook salmon. Sometimes it takes a long time to catch one. Hours and hours even. So understandably I was resting below deck when the big event happened so I missed being there to get my photo with it before it was packed away on ice to keep it fresh. However, after we got to the human’s friends dock, I got to meet it.

Have you ever kissed a fish before? Apparently it’s a thing and I just did it too. It’s an old tradition although sparse on the details. The why’s and wherefurs of the purractise diffurs from one to another but here are a few reasons:

            • To bring good luck
            • To attract more fish
            • A thank you for getting caught
            • Apologize for catching
            • Out of respect
            • Speed up healing from hook (only for catch and release fish)
            • To become a true Newfoundlander
            • Selfie opportunity
            • A dare

Is it safe to kiss a fish? Due to fish being known to host to a variety of microscopic parasites, you could run the risk of getting a viral infection when kissing it. That can be further amplified if the water it was caught in was contaminated with any toxic waste and bacteria, either resulting in an upset tummy and severe diarrhea for several days.

I supurrvised the human as he cut up the fish, and the one he caught the day before, into smaller dinner sized pieces, but when he got out the machine to shrink wrap them to put in the freezer, I headed out to my usual purrch to relax and keep a watch out for any flying thieves. Now we will have fish all year round.

 

Next we are heading for warmer water and less windy areas back in one of our faourite places, Prideaux Haven, for a couple days. Paw paw for now =^,,^=

Motion Monday – On Seagull Watch

First it was geese, then ducks and a swan, and now I have to safeguard all our freshly caught seafood from these intelligent but pesky birds. They float idly around the boat for hours just waiting for an oppurrtunity to grab and go. Not on my watch they don’t.

One interesting fact my human told me was that “Seagulls can drink both fresh and salt water. Most animals are unable to do this, but seagulls have a special pair of glands right above their eyes which is specifically designed to flush the salt from their systems through openings in the bill.”

I had a checkup by a cat doctor 2 weeks ago and my blood work didn’t indicate a lack or abundance of salt in my system, so I guess I’m normal. However, I have been having a bit of a salt craving and discovered that anything around the anchor chain to be a tasty source. Upon further research by my ever curious human mom, it is actually safe for us kitties to routinely drink salt water since we can tolerate a higher salt intake than humans. While humans have to watch their salt intake, it appears that we don’t have to do the same. Our kidneys are able to excrete sodium at a much greater efficiency than humans.

Today we are in Campbell River visiting the human’s friends. Their house is actually riverfront with a dock and we are tied up to it.  After we pulled up over 200 prawns and left Cassel Falls in Teakearne Arm (the humans were right again about Teakearne Arm) we headed west to Cortes Bay which is a bit south of Squirrel Cove. There human’s friends showed up in their fishing boat to take them fishing. It was a little bouncy out in the wide open water so I volunteered to stay and take care of Minstrel until they came back. Yesterday the humans fished their way across the strait while waiting for the tide to be high enough to get up the river. Again the humans have gone fishing and the wind is still really gusty so this time both me and my human mom volunteered to stay on Minstrel.

Next post I will have some fishy tails to tells you. Paw paw for now! =^,,^=

All Is Naut Lost – Part II

Writing 101, Day 13: Earlier in the course, you wrote about losing something. Today, write about finding something. For your twist, view day four’s post and today’s post as installments in a series. (Part IPart III)


Can you believe that, about an hour after discovering that her wallet was lost, mom had the phone number in hand of the person who claimed to have found it. One of their fellow PMPSS members, whose boat was ironically named “No Worries”, had been contacted via VHF Radio and was given the name and phone number of someone named John Mang to pass along when they saw her. So then the humans just had to figure out when and where to arrange a meeting. Continue reading