Following the Sea To Home Port

IMG_3351I believe the human phrase by Henry David Thoreau is “never look back unless you are planning to go that way”. Well I’m looking back because I can’t stop thinking about all the pawsome adventures we’ve just had. Look at my face – I’m not happy.  Do we really have to go home? Yes somebody has to earn the big bucks to put fuel in the tanks so we can go again. And go again we will on the long weekend cruise to Bowen Island at the beginning of September, just three weeks from now, purr purr.

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Heading south on Malaspina strait to Welcome Pass.

Minstrel’s twin cat engines purred steadily along during the 6 1/2 hour cruise it takes to get back to Port Moody, and I catnapped for most of it. We started out in a pleasure-to-cruise-in fallowing sea for about 3 hours until we left the more protected corridor of Malaspina Strait called Welcome Pass, and continued into the noticeably bumpier following sea of the Georgia Strait.  In nautical terms, fallowing relatively means calm, inactive waters, and following is when the boat and any waves are going in the same direction. A following sea can be quite dangerous in high wind & waves, but these were small gentle rollers mixed in with busy afternoon boat-traffic waves …like from one of the BC Ferries that’s following behind us. Yikes – better get out of the way captain dad!

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BC Ferry following behind us near Howe Sound.

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Bowers Away In Ballet Bay

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Meow at anchor in scenic Ballet Bay.

Ballet Bay at Nelson Island was our last anchorage of the cruise before we headed homeward. The shores are inhabited by human housing and our 5 vessel fleet was hard-pressed to find a good spot to raft-up that didn’t have an underwater (submarine) cable running through it. Last thing you want to have happen is the anchor getting caught on it. If you can’t free your anchor, then you might have to cut it loose. A bower is another name for an anchor carried on the bow of a boat.

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Anchor snagged on an underwater cable.

Actually 3 vessels in our fleet including Minstrel snagged an underwater cable while trying to retrieve our anchors. Even with beach signage or chart symbols displaying the international symbol of wavy line colored magenta or black trying to advise the location of cables, they can get out of position for many reasons. Luckily it was a thin television type of cable and fairly easy to bring to the surface to get un-snagged. However, boaters must be extremely careful  to not to break or cut cables, avoiding serious or even fatal injury if it whips free. Cables that carry very high voltage can prove lethal if they are cut. The tension weight of some cables can also affects the stability of smaller vessels with the risk  of sinking when attempting to raise them from the seabed. Damage to cables can cause serious disruption to communications affecting trade, international affairs, and safety at sea, or to some human’s favourite TV show.

IMG_3274Approximately 2.5kms north across Blind Channel on Musket Island was another geocache. Human mom didn’t have anymore pinback buttons to trade so she decided to use a youth sized t-shirt she had designed for a squadron initiative that said “I Got Caught Wearing My Lifejacket”. The geocache description said that the container had swag that was meant for boaters, and this seemed very fitting.  Both humans hopped into Jester the dinghy because this time human dad wanted to help find it. The location was breathtaking. At the top of a broad rock face was the marine park sign and the cache was easily found near it. Mom traded the t-shirt for a brand new fishing hook, but didn’t have a pen to sign the log book. Meowee, that makes 3 geocaches my trackable fish tag has visited on this cruise.

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Contents of “Musket Island Marine Cache” geocache.

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The Derelict Vessel Mrs. Pauley

Writing 101 Day 18: Craft a story from the perspective of a twelve-year-old observing it all. For your twist, focus on specific character qualities, drawing from elements we’ve worked on in this course, like voice and dialogue.

Prompt: She had seen better days, but Mrs. Pauley had been grounded there since before anyone can remember. She’d fallen in disrepair and no one knew who her captain was. The Harbour Authority, accompanied by C-Tow, have come to evict Mrs. Pauley from the coast she’s served on for forty years.


They’d come for her. She’d been called a derelict, an environmental and safety hazard, and she had to go. The grownups were tired of her, “an eye soar unbecoming to a budding resort marina”, they said. With so much talk about her over the years, I felt like I knew her, yet I knew nothing about her except that I felt sorry for her. She had an unusual name for a boat. It was a couple of years before I realized she was a boat and not some neighbour my parents were bad-mouthing. Then all the comments suddenly made a lot more sense. I had always thought that Mrs. Pauley was some poor old lady who had been abandoned by her husband after fourty years, and having no where to live  she camped on the beach without power, or water taps, and had to wash up on the shore. Continue reading

All Is Naut Lost – Part II

Writing 101, Day 13: Earlier in the course, you wrote about losing something. Today, write about finding something. For your twist, view day four’s post and today’s post as installments in a series. (Part IPart III)


Can you believe that, about an hour after discovering that her wallet was lost, mom had the phone number in hand of the person who claimed to have found it. One of their fellow PMPSS members, whose boat was ironically named “No Worries”, had been contacted via VHF Radio and was given the name and phone number of someone named John Mang to pass along when they saw her. So then the humans just had to figure out when and where to arrange a meeting. Continue reading

All Is Naut Lost – Part I

Writing 101, Day 4 – Today, write about a loss. The twist: make this the first post in a three-post series. (Part II, Part III)


Meow my furiends. The topic of this assignment couldn’t be more purrfect. It’s so amazing how the catzmos works at times.  I was trying to figure out how to start telling this true story about something remarkable that happened to my mom but it’s a bit long so  breaking it up into parts solves that problem. Continue reading

Adventures at April Point

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April point on the west side Quadra Island is the gateway point for major fishing excursions or to cruise north to the Discovery Islands. The marina we are in is located in the cove east of April Point Resort in a quiet secluded & protected bay. Continue reading