Magic Monday – Mobile Photography Editing & Processing

The magic of instant effect generators takes a ho-hum or flawed photo and transforms it into something unexpected and unusual. What I like about these types of apps is that at each tap of your pad (or human finger), effects, overlays and borders randomly apply themselves. Instantly. Right on your phone. Meowee, over 2 million possible combinations can make it a real challenge to like just one. So for Sally’s Mobile Photography Challenge this week, we used the same photo with two different outcomes. There are several apps that do this but the one we’ve been using is called Pixlr-o-matic, and is free to download to your iPhone, and probably Android too but we don’t use them to know fur shore. Hipstamatic is another as is Snapseed.

iphoneartoriginalI must have tapped about a hundred times until I decided on the looks I liked best for this photo. You can also makes minor tweaks to change any element of the combo. This ho-hum photo is of meow sitting on the stern rail where the prawn puller gets attached. I was trying to give the humans a hint. Turns out i didn’t have to try too hard; they managed to haul up almost 500 of them overall this cruise. Behind me is doggy-doo island in Squirrel Cove on Cortes Island that the humans took me to play on. As my nickname for it implied you had to be careful where you stepped and that didn’t impress meow much, and I just wanted to go back to Minstrel. The camera focused more on the island than meow so I’m a little blurry. A little insta-magic editing made the save.

In the first photo, the effect is called “Greg“. All the effects have people’s names and they are supposed to set the mood of the photo. The overlay is called “Rain“. It was actually was raining that day. Thirdly the frame is called “Sloppy“. The result? Kind of a pop artish look don’t you think?

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For the next photo, a few more taps and we have the “Lucas” effect, “Morning” overlay, and “Sand” frame. Seems to give it a bit of a washed out retro feel.

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So many looks, so little time. What phone photo editing apps are you using?

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Big-Eyed Selfie

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Big eyed,
On something you
Have spied.

A sound,
Your attention
Has found.

Hurry,
A pose, take the
Selfie!

The Musette, created by Emily Romano is a poem that consists of three verses of three lines each. The first lines have two syllables; the second lines have four syllables, and the third lines have two syllables. The rhyme scheme is a/b/a for the first verse; c/d/c for the second verse, and e/f/e for the third verse. The title should reflect the poem’s content

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We are joining THE CAT ON MY HEAD for Sunday Selfies.Click here to see more selfies, and join the fun!

Caturday Art – Cartoon Meow

cartoon purrsea

Meowee, is that meow?! I really like this new cartoon look. When human mom took this photo on her iPhone 5, I was affectionately brushing up against human dad’s legs because he was peeling some prawns and I was hoping to get some. She then edited it with the Photo Lab app and applied the Fancy Filter: Cartoon effect, and cropped it.  I think we’ll experiment with this one, or something similar, a bit more. A cartoon comic strip in my future? That could be fun.

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This is a blog hop.

Click here to see more and join in the fun!

 

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She’s Back – Again

IMG_3369 It’s been just over a year to the day when she left the 2nd time, and now Sammy, the she-devil, is back. It was a real purr-kill to return home after such a pawsome holiday and find her living here again. The first few days were hell. We growled and hissed our displeasure at every turn. The humans thought I hated them, which I did for awhile, blaming them for allowing it. I really don’t know how long she’ll be here either, and neither do the humans.

All Sammy wants to do, when she’s not sleeping inside, is go outside, and has a hissy fit if she can’t. Human mom is concerned that she might meet the same fate as some of those poor kitties whose pictures are attached to the streetlight poles – the missing ones. Once Sammy was taken to stay for awhile at another human friends house by her human. Of course as soon as someone cracked a door open, Sammy wasted no time bolting through it. However, she was in a strange neighbourhood near a noisy main street, all the makings for a cat to get lost because of. It wasn’t too far from our place so my human mom would go and walk around the streets there and call for her, ironically attaching pictures of Sammy to the streetlights poles. For ten days there was no sign of her and they all thought the worst. But that fate was not to be. On the eleventh day, out of the blue, Sammy jumped the fence back into the yard of the other humans who then called my human to come get her. And she was back. Really?! Have you ever seen that cartoon, “The Cat Came Back“…

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Maybe she won’t see me…

Did fate bring us back together again? I can’t imagine what for. Did we not learn something before that now needs repeating? I really had no choice in her coming back now did I. It is within my control to try to ignore her and pretend she doesn’t exist and stay out of her way. But then she eats my food, drinks my water and uses my litter box, and her dark fur on the white carpet is everywhere. What will happen now? Will it be my destiny to have to suffer her presence through all nine of my lives? I have no idea; Que Sera Sera.

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Following the Sea To Home Port

IMG_3351I believe the human phrase by Henry David Thoreau is “never look back unless you are planning to go that way”. Well I’m looking back because I can’t stop thinking about all the pawsome adventures we’ve just had. Look at my face – I’m not happy.  Do we really have to go home? Yes somebody has to earn the big bucks to put fuel in the tanks so we can go again. And go again we will on the long weekend cruise to Bowen Island at the beginning of September, just three weeks from now, purr purr.

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Heading south on Malaspina strait to Welcome Pass.

Minstrel’s twin cat engines purred steadily along during the 6 1/2 hour cruise it takes to get back to Port Moody, and I catnapped for most of it. We started out in a pleasure-to-cruise-in fallowing sea for about 3 hours until we left the more protected corridor of Malaspina Strait called Welcome Pass, and continued into the noticeably bumpier following sea of the Georgia Strait.  In nautical terms, fallowing relatively means calm, inactive waters, and following is when the boat and any waves are going in the same direction. A following sea can be quite dangerous in high wind & waves, but these were small gentle rollers mixed in with busy afternoon boat-traffic waves …like from one of the BC Ferries that’s following behind us. Yikes – better get out of the way captain dad!

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BC Ferry following behind us near Howe Sound.

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Finally A Furiend in Garden Bay

IMG_3327After considerable scrutiny upon our arrival I was satisfied that the dock master had given us a suitable spot. A welcoming committee was waiting to help secure Minstrel to her starboard side dock assignment. The fleet had all returned and regrouped once again at Garden Bay Marina in Pender Harbour for the last two days of the cruise before heading home.

After we were plugged and settled in, human dad left to set out the crab traps. Meowee, crab! Now wouldn’t that be a special treat to end the cruise with.

IMG_3338IMG_3339Remember on day two when I was looking for a furiend in Garden Bay? Well guess who’s here? Tucker! Tucker likes kitties, and I like him, so I immediately jumped off the boat onto the dock to say hi to my old furiend. The teddy-bear faced bichon frise is getting along in years but is still very photogenic and has been featured in the squadron’s past three annual Pets and Wildlife calendars that human mom has printed. I’m in this years too, of course. I can show you the 2013 photos that have been uploaded to Flickr where you can meet some of my other squadron furiends. I’ve got to get the 2014 photos uploaded soon, which has been on my “to do” list since January. Does that list ever get done!

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Boat Graveyard in Gerrans Bay

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Coming into Gerrans Bay, Pender Harbour, BC

As we cruised into Gerrans Bay in Pender Harbour to visit the human’s cabin and their relatives, a disturbing sight caught my attention. For the last few years or so, there were two derelict boats anchored there. Now there are five more of these floating nightmares. What is going on here! The quiet little bay, that has managed to stay somewhat off the radar than the more popular anchorages in Pender Harbour, is turning into a marine graveyard.

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More derelict eyesores.

Of the 2 pre-existing derelicts, one has now sunk, and the other washed up on shore. When vessels sink or are abandoned in bays, harbours and shorelines, they can be an eyesore and a hazard to navigation.  At the same time, they can physically destroy sensitive marine and coastal habitats, sink or move during coastal storms, disperse oil and toxic chemicals still on board, become a source of marine debris and spread decrepit nets, fishing gear, and plastics that entangle and endanger marine life. To complicate matters further,  reviews and permits may be required to remove boats that have sat on the bottom for years, even decades, that may attract the growth of corals and other endangered species on them, or have been abandoned for more than 50 years with respect to historical preservation.

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Derelict vessel ashore.

Human mom tried her best to explain to me the complexities of having these vessels decommissioned and removed until I went cross-eyed. However, I was relieved to find out the humans are finally developing solutions to address the recent increase in numbers. The “do whatever it takes” attitude while understandable, doesn’t always pay especially if the vessel has lost any salvage value. Unlike automobiles, it can cost a lot of money to properly remove and dispose of a boat. Some owners, if they can be found at all, can’t or won’t pay for it although it is ultimately their responsibility. Slowly but shorely, the humans are sharing and implementing what they call “best practices” around the world to deal with these hazards, and to discourage any more from becoming one.

I’m pleased to announce that next month in September, my humans and other members of the Port Moody Power & Sail Squadron will be participating in the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup within the harbour of Port Moody. The squadron also has a public facebook page dedicated to the awareness and discussion of environmental marine issues including derelict vessels.

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The tiny yellow family cabin.

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Bowers Away In Ballet Bay

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Meow at anchor in scenic Ballet Bay.

Ballet Bay at Nelson Island was our last anchorage of the cruise before we headed homeward. The shores are inhabited by human housing and our 5 vessel fleet was hard-pressed to find a good spot to raft-up that didn’t have an underwater (submarine) cable running through it. Last thing you want to have happen is the anchor getting caught on it. If you can’t free your anchor, then you might have to cut it loose. A bower is another name for an anchor carried on the bow of a boat.

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Anchor snagged on an underwater cable.

Actually 3 vessels in our fleet including Minstrel snagged an underwater cable while trying to retrieve our anchors. Even with beach signage or chart symbols displaying the international symbol of wavy line colored magenta or black trying to advise the location of cables, they can get out of position for many reasons. Luckily it was a thin television type of cable and fairly easy to bring to the surface to get un-snagged. However, boaters must be extremely careful  to not to break or cut cables, avoiding serious or even fatal injury if it whips free. Cables that carry very high voltage can prove lethal if they are cut. The tension weight of some cables can also affects the stability of smaller vessels with the risk  of sinking when attempting to raise them from the seabed. Damage to cables can cause serious disruption to communications affecting trade, international affairs, and safety at sea, or to some human’s favourite TV show.

IMG_3274Approximately 2.5kms north across Blind Channel on Musket Island was another geocache. Human mom didn’t have anymore pinback buttons to trade so she decided to use a youth sized t-shirt she had designed for a squadron initiative that said “I Got Caught Wearing My Lifejacket”. The geocache description said that the container had swag that was meant for boaters, and this seemed very fitting.  Both humans hopped into Jester the dinghy because this time human dad wanted to help find it. The location was breathtaking. At the top of a broad rock face was the marine park sign and the cache was easily found near it. Mom traded the t-shirt for a brand new fishing hook, but didn’t have a pen to sign the log book. Meowee, that makes 3 geocaches my trackable fish tag has visited on this cruise.

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Contents of “Musket Island Marine Cache” geocache.

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